Offensive environments in Triple-A and Double-A

When evaluating prospects it is crucial to consider the offensive environment they play in. Today we’ll take a look at the offensive levels at the Triple-A and Double-A levels. Note that all statistics are per game and the triple slash notes the league averages.

Triple-A

International League -.262/.328/.395
Runs- 4.297
2B- 1.826
3B- .184
HR- .751
BB- 3.069
K- 6.664
SB- .737

Pacific Coast league- .272/.341/.418
Runs- 4.879
2B- 1.863
3B- .258
HR- .865
BB- 3.355
K- 6.664
SB- .705

Double-A

Eastern League- .258/.332/.385
Runs- 4.292
2B- 1.770
3B- .212
HR- .661
BB- 3.386
K- 6.776
SB- .642

Southern League- .256/.332/.380
Runs- 4.294
2B- 1.745
3B- .209
HR- .638
BB- 3.508
K- 6.788
SB- .762

Texas League- .266/.340/.391
Runs- 4.787
2B- 1.701
3B- .229
HR- .697
BB- 3.554
K- 6.309
SB- .804

The results pretty much speak for themselves. The Pacific Coast League is well known as a hitters paradise and the offensive measures are significantly higher than the International League. The Texas League’s numbers are slightly inflated from the other Double-A leagues as well.

Consider this example. This season Allen Craig hit .322/.374/.547 with 26 home runs for the Memphis Redbirds of the Pacific League. Matt LaPorta batted .299/.388/.530 for the Columbus Clippers of the International League. Who had the better season? Well by comparing their OBPs and SLG percentages to their respective league averages we find that LaPorta was .06 points above the league mark in on-base percentage and .135 points ahead in slugging. Craig meanwhile was just .033 points above the league norm in on-base percentage and .129 points ahead in slugging. It would appear LaPorta had a slight edge when comparing the two players using this method.

These differences may not seem like much, and perhaps they aren’t, but it is at least worth noting. Tomorrow I will take a look at the lower levels of the minors.

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Comments

  1. Bonds500500 said...

    Good Article.

    By the way, John Bowker(Fresno) hits a .342/.451/.596(366At Bat) in PCL. And, He gets more BB than SO (74BB/64SO). This was Amazing for me…

    However, Bowker was struggled in Major League.

    Batting Stats that recorded in PCL isn’t credible?

  2. Alex Pedicini said...

    Bonds, its not to say that PCL stats aren’t credible just that they must be taken in context. Obviously Bowker’s numbers are incredible and they probably would be in any other league. But if you have two players with similar numbers and one is playing in the IL and the other in the PCL, i’d go with the guy in the International League

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